In the News

  • Department of Energy Announces $14 Million for Fusion Energy Sciences Research

    Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $14 million in funding for 10 university-led research projects using the DIII-D National Fusion Facility, operated by General Atomics in San Diego.  A major goal of the research is to develop methods of sustaining steady-state or continuous operation of fusion reactors, an essential step toward eventually making nuclear fusion a practical energy source.

  • San Diego Plays a Key Part in Development of Fusion Energy

    San Diego is known for many things – its climate, its beaches, its naval base. But there is a little-known industry in the region that seeks to change the future of humanity. All the stars in the universe rely on fusion, and San Diego has its own star in DIII-D at General Atomics: a donut-shaped chamber that heats matter to more than 100 million degrees. [In Spanish]

  • A ‘significant leap’ in experiments at nuclear fusion project based at General Atomics

    The energy potential for nuclear fusion has always been remarkably ambitious but progress has usually been painfully slow. But researchers and collaborators working on the DIII-D National Fusion Facility based at San Diego’s General Atomics have completed a series of successful experiments with an approach called “Super-H Mode” that has improved performance so dramatically they think it will accelerate the development of nuclear fusion reactors that could result, in theory, in a virtually limitless source of clean, carbon-free energy.

  • Flipping the Script with Reverse D-Shaped Plasmas

    A team at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility, operated by General Atomics, recently achieved high-pressure operation of a plasma configuration known as a reverse D. They did so while maintaining a low pressure, stable region near the plasma edge that was inherently free of reactor-damaging disruptions. Their work turned conventional wisdom about plasmas on its head.

  • A Trojan Horse for Fusion Disruptions

    A plasma disruption can damage tokamak walls and other structures. Mitigating disruptions means injecting impurities into the plasma. The impurities radiate the plasma energy evenly around the tokamak as light. But how do you add impurities deeply into something so hot? A team at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility, operated by General Atomics, devised a way to inject impurities deep into the plasma using thin-walled diamond shells that carry a payload of boron dust.

  • Nuclear Fusion Program at General Atomics Resumes Experiments

    After shutting down for 11 months for upgrades, an ambitious U.S. Department of Energy nuclear fusion program is about to resume conducting experiments at San Diego’s General Atomics. The DIII-D National Fusion Program looks to further developments in the decades-long quest to harness the vast potential of nuclear fusion for practical purposes, such as generating electricity at power plants.

  • DIII-D National Fusion Program Completes Year-Long Facility Upgrade

    The new technologies installed during the 11-month upgrade will play a key role in developing the scientific basis for fusion as a reliable and nearly limitless energy source. When experiments restart in early June, researchers will converge on San Diego to use these tools to optimize the performance of fusion plasmas and help bring practical fusion energy closer to realization.

  • Meet the Director: David Hill, DIII-D

    To eight-year-old David Hill, the UFO-like top and spindly legs of the Space Needle looked like the future. Outside his suburban Seattle home, he'd climb trees to watch workers as they built the Space Needle in preparation for the 1962 World's Fair. When he saw the Needle finally completed, he felt like he was experiencing "tomorrow" right in the present day.

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