In the News

  • How the Navy Prepared Me to Become a Leader in the Nuclear Industry

    General Atomics Director of Business Development for the Energy Group Zabrina Johal talks about how her service as a nuclear-trained officer in the U.S. Navy prepared her for a career in the nuclear industry and helping GA innovate in advanced nuclear.

  • Taming plasmas: Improving fusion using microwaves

    An international team at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility has developed a new way to suppress damaging waves in fusion plasmas using microwaves. The researchers believe the results can lead to the development of approaches to control or reduce the presence of waves in the magnetic fields and could help chart a path to more efficient fusion energy.

  • Inside job: A new technique to cool a fusion reactor

    Researchers at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility have demonstrated a revolutionary new technique to achieve "inside-out" cooling of fusion plasmas before a disruption occurs. The new approach transforms prospects for fusion energy by potentially solving three major problems—efficiently radiating away the plasma's heat, reducing forces by the plasma on the fusion device, and preventing the formation of energetic electron beams.

  • Big Gains for Tiny Nuclear Reactors

    As the hubbub of interest and activity surrounds development of small modular reactors (SMRs) hovering between 60 MW and 300 MW, and medium-sized nuclear reactors of under 700 MW, several nuclear technology vendors including General Atomics have quietly been developing micro-reactors—which are of 10 MW or less.

  • Dr. Christina Back Testifies in Support of Advanced Nuclear Energy

    Dr. Christina Back, General Atomics’ vice president for Nuclear Technologies and Materials, testified Sept. 13 before the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works about the benefits of advanced nuclear technology, specifically accident tolerant fuel (ATF) for commercial nuclear reactors. Back discussed the need to efficiently review and license ATF concepts, such as the one GA is developing with Westinghouse that uses an innovative silicon-carbide cladding to help make reactors even safer and more economically competitive.

    The testimony can be viewed here.

    Dr. Christina Back Testifies in Support of Advanced Nuclear Energy
    Dr. Christina Back, right, shows an innovative silicon-carbide cladding for Accident Tolerant Fuel to members of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works during her recent testimony.
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